WIN: Tickets to see the AlunaGeorge Go Show with VEVO and Lucozade Energy

This post brought to you by Lucozade Energy. All opinions are 100% mine.

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Lucozade Energy has formed a partnership exclusively with VEVO to bring you the opportunity to win tickets to see AlunaGeorge perform for the VEVO Go Show, which is set to take place in London during the Summer. The location of the venue is yet to be revealed, but is among London’s most prestigious - so will guarantee to impress. Further, tickets for the event will not be on general sale to the public, rather, they will only be available via a series of exclusive competitions running from the Lucozade Energy website after June 1st.

AlunaGeorge is a musical duo from London comprised of Aluna Francis and George Reid. Aluna provides cool, assertive and distinctively British vocals which sit wonderfully over George’s fleeting, disorientating sample based hip-hop. The effect is twitching and ragged but achingly smooth and accompanied by a rich woozy bass sound. They’ve already had huge success with singles ‘White Noise’ and ‘Attracting Flies’, and look set to hit the big time with more singles to follow. Their next showcase takes place at the VEVO Go Show and offer the chance for lucky fans to spend some time with the duo after the show is over. 

To enter the competition to win tickets to see Aluna George at the VEVO Go Show, head over to either the Lucozade Energy Facebook or the Lucozade Energy Website. Look out for further opportunities to win tickets over the next few weeks from Lucozade’s YES Project. If you are lucky enough to have a promotional pack (present on selected Lucozade Bottles), simply enter your code and your email address at https://www.lucozadeenergy.com/yesproject for a reminder when more competitions go live. Lucozade will let you know as soon as another opportunity to win tickets or music exclusives arises. 

You can enter using the VEVO Go Show Facebook page.

Good luck.

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Au Revoir Simone: Fragile Electro Pop 

Commuting through the use of trains has been a common practice especially for Brooklynites. And on a fateful ride from Vermont to New York, two young musical ingénues namely Erika Forster and Annie Hart were able to befriend each other by accident. Ironically, they found out that both of them have a strong passion to form an all-keyboard band, thus immediately becoming friends and co-composers. By 2003, the duo was joined by 2 other ladies namely Heather D’Angelo and Sung Bin Park who have the same affinity for creating electronic music, and the rest was history. The quartet decided to name their band Au Revoir Simone, in homage to a minor character from a Tim Burton film. But before the release of their very first album, Park decided to part ways with the group to pursue solo projects. Yet even with the group lacking one member, they still decided to push through with their band. As such, the current line-up of Au Revoir Simone was cemented. 

Critics and independent music enthusiasts alike describe their sound as very dreamy yet upbeat. Even the famed Rolling Stone magazine defines the band’s music as: “The ladies of Au Revoir Simone create ethereal electro-pop perfect for a lazy Sunday morning.” With each member having an amazing talent to simultaneously sing and manipulate a multitude of instruments namely: synthesizers, keyboards, and drum machines, the ladies have garnered much respect in the underground music scene which led them to be discovered by Moshi Moshi Records. A small recording company based in Rhoda Street in London, this label was responsible for releasing music of bands who now bask in mainstream fame like Florence and the Machine and Bloc Party. And just a mere 30 minutes away from Rhoda Street via riding the Shoreditch line and ending up at Leicester Square, one can be able to find a treasure trove of entertainment venues like The Hippodrome Casino. This glamorous activity hub offers an array of amenities such as poker, blackjack, roulette, and slots which can also be accessed by online gaming enthusiasts via partycasino. Dabbling in games such as poker and blackjack challenges players to risk big in order to possibly win bigger. Creativity is honed among participants as the most ingenious of strategies are much triumphant. Speed in decision-making is also practiced as such card games involve choosing one’s moves quickly. Furthermore, playing these also provides recreation. 

Going back, with the band being able to floor not only American but British fans as well, they were able to release 4 full-length albums and six singles. All filled with delicately-laced vocals, melodic fusion of synthesizers, and infectious drum machine tempos. Truly, the trio of the seemingly precocious-looking Au Revoir Simone is the epitome of fragile electro pop. 

Unknown Mortal Orchestra - So Good At Being In Trouble

UMO dropped the second cut (first below) from their forthcoming album “II” this week - a steady, stripped-back soul track with a warm, wistful vocal - entitled “So Good At Being In Trouble”. Album release is set for February 5th before a welcome Fallon performance later that month. Full information at the Jagjaguwar blog.

"Swim And Sleep (Like A Shark)"


London-born, Brighton-based DJ Lorca, aka 22-year old Xxx Xxxxxxx, remains a relatively new emergent from Brighton’s resilient house music scene. But off the back of his debut white label release ‘Moments’ on Live Ones last July, Lorca is now known not just as prolific but also as critically acclaimed, dropping an unrelenting string of 12” singles on high-profile record labels Left_Blank, Third Ear and now Dummy.
It was the latter label, Dummy Magazine subsidiary Dummy Records, which served up Lorca’s most successful single to date this March; a breathtaking and rhythmically-charged 12” release by name of “Can’t See Higher/Missed Me”, infused on side A with a deep, angular bass, hypnotic samples and a searing, drone-like fuzz, affording on side B something of a more low-end tribal undertone to Lorca’s signature focus and endearing drive.
Throughout Lorca’s rapidly expanding discography, it is clear that the headphone-panning idiosyncrasies in the rhythm-section are key to the success of his sound. But whilst a subtle influence from dubstep (most apparent on ‘Moments’) has tended to fade over time, tentative shades accrue on occasion in the whirring, errant instrumentation of tracks like ‘Hold Back’, ‘Giant Star’ and others. Sample-wise, Lorca is consistently soulful and selective, tending towards the subtle re-layering of female vocals in line with his nostalgia-driven choice of samples and patient, slow-burning compositional ethos.
Acclaim has come (deservedly) from all sides. Not only have his tracks made the cut for BBC Radio 1 Essential Mixes curated by the likes of Modeselektor and Scuba, but Bonobo included ‘Can’t See Higher’ in his 2012 Bestival DJ set. Since the start of his collaboration with booking agency Elastica Artists, Lorca has made appearances across the Europe and the UK, including festival sets at Croatia’s Dimensions and Echo Festivals, as well as acquiring the position of DJ in residence at weighty Brighton club night AKA AKA ROAR.
Following Lorca’s most recent release, a blissfully smooth Faith Evans vs Nuyorican Soul remix on Corsica Studios’ club night-turned-label Church, and ahead of two new remixes due out before the end of the year, I caught up with Sam to discuss his gradual shift away from dubstep, ideas for a new live show, and first-hand take on the place of vinyl in a scene where DJs are increasingly shifting towards CD and digital formats…

tP: Lorca isn’t your first project, how did this one come about?
L: I was originally making dubstep, but then I started making other stuff as my taste began to develop. I ended up getting into more chilled out stuff. I just got bored of dubstep after a while.
tP: Why ‘Lorca’ the name?
L: I was living on a houseboat called ‘Lorca’.  The houseboat was named after the poet, ‘Lorca’, who I’ve checked out and I like – but my DJ name is not quite so romantic. He is no great influence on me.
tP: Who would you consider your contemporaries?
L: They change all the time. When I first started doing Lorca in 2009, Joy Orbison and Scuba were huge, and ‘HYPH MNGO’ had just come out. That was a real turning point for me.
tP: What kind of effect has working with bigger labels had on the way you like to work? Does it affect your ability as an artist to refine and rework your tracks over time?
L: When I’ve done a track – they are done. I’ll never go near it again. But it varies – with Dummy, Leo came to my house in Brighton and just said ‘play me everything you have’ – and I played him my demos, some really rough demos – and he kind of let me choose what I wanted to release – that’s the way I like to work.tP: But can too much perfectionism in your writing hurt?
L: Yeah – its very confusing when you’re working on tracks. I’ve had tracks I’ve been working on for months, and if you listen to the fine grain of them, you end up messing the track up entirely. I’ve done that enough times. I’ve done 15 versions of some tracks before switching back 10 versions and settling with that. I think sometimes I pay too much attention to the fine grain and not enough to the feel of the track. Its ultimately more about the feel – you can get lost entirely if you go too far into the grain of it.


tP: And does reaching this wider audience have an impact too?
L: It does. Can’t See Higher on Dummy Records brought me up a level and really put pressure on me to make something just as good every time! But you can’t think about that. For now I’m going to try and make what I want to make.tP: So what else have you got coming up we should know about? You’ve just put out a record with Church…
L: That remix with Church was my choice, I thought the two tracks blended together well. I also have two more remixes for different labels coming out. One is coming out in October, and then another definitely before the end of the year.
tP: Have you ever thought about doing gigs outside of clubs, maybe in a more relaxed setting?
L: Yeah, definitely. The more I DJ the more I think about doing something slightly different. I’ve been thinking about a live show.  So many people go to clubs for the madness rather than the music. Its just the setting DJs have to play in if they want to advance themselves. Thing is I’m in this DJing scene now where my music is played by DJs, so I’m not playing in the library just yet…
tP: Do you think there is much place for vinyl now that so many DJs have been liberated by the CD?
L: I use both vinyl and CD. CD because you can burn so many tracks, and I find myself a few days before a gig wanting to work something new into my set. Beatport has so many tracks you won’t find in your record store down the road. That is the easiest way to get new music – its instant. I still pick up records when I can, I prefer the sound of them and they are definitely more fun to mix with.
reprinted with permission from USSU Pulse Magazine.

London-born, Brighton-based DJ Lorca, aka 22-year old Xxx Xxxxxxx, remains a relatively new emergent from Brighton’s resilient house music scene. But off the back of his debut white label release ‘Moments’ on Live Ones last July, Lorca is now known not just as prolific but also as critically acclaimed, dropping an unrelenting string of 12” singles on high-profile record labels Left_Blank, Third Ear and now Dummy.

It was the latter label, Dummy Magazine subsidiary Dummy Records, which served up Lorca’s most successful single to date this March; a breathtaking and rhythmically-charged 12” release by name of “Can’t See Higher/Missed Me”, infused on side A with a deep, angular bass, hypnotic samples and a searing, drone-like fuzz, affording on side B something of a more low-end tribal undertone to Lorca’s signature focus and endearing drive.

Throughout Lorca’s rapidly expanding discography, it is clear that the headphone-panning idiosyncrasies in the rhythm-section are key to the success of his sound. But whilst a subtle influence from dubstep (most apparent on ‘Moments’) has tended to fade over time, tentative shades accrue on occasion in the whirring, errant instrumentation of tracks like ‘Hold Back’, ‘Giant Star’ and others. Sample-wise, Lorca is consistently soulful and selective, tending towards the subtle re-layering of female vocals in line with his nostalgia-driven choice of samples and patient, slow-burning compositional ethos.

Acclaim has come (deservedly) from all sides. Not only have his tracks made the cut for BBC Radio 1 Essential Mixes curated by the likes of Modeselektor and Scuba, but Bonobo included ‘Can’t See Higher’ in his 2012 Bestival DJ set. Since the start of his collaboration with booking agency Elastica Artists, Lorca has made appearances across the Europe and the UK, including festival sets at Croatia’s Dimensions and Echo Festivals, as well as acquiring the position of DJ in residence at weighty Brighton club night AKA AKA ROAR.

Following Lorca’s most recent release, a blissfully smooth Faith Evans vs Nuyorican Soul remix on Corsica Studios’ club night-turned-label Church, and ahead of two new remixes due out before the end of the year, I caught up with Sam to discuss his gradual shift away from dubstep, ideas for a new live show, and first-hand take on the place of vinyl in a scene where DJs are increasingly shifting towards CD and digital formats…

tP: Lorca isn’t your first project, how did this one come about?

L: I was originally making dubstep, but then I started making other stuff as my taste began to develop. I ended up getting into more chilled out stuff. I just got bored of dubstep after a while.

tP: Why ‘Lorca’ the name?

L: I was living on a houseboat called ‘Lorca’.  The houseboat was named after the poet, ‘Lorca’, who I’ve checked out and I like – but my DJ name is not quite so romantic. He is no great influence on me.

tP: Who would you consider your contemporaries?

L: They change all the time. When I first started doing Lorca in 2009, Joy Orbison and Scuba were huge, and ‘HYPH MNGO’ had just come out. That was a real turning point for me.

tP: What kind of effect has working with bigger labels had on the way you like to work? Does it affect your ability as an artist to refine and rework your tracks over time?

L: When I’ve done a track – they are done. I’ll never go near it again. But it varies – with Dummy, Leo came to my house in Brighton and just said ‘play me everything you have’ – and I played him my demos, some really rough demos – and he kind of let me choose what I wanted to release – that’s the way I like to work.

tP: 
But can too much perfectionism in your writing hurt?

L: Yeah – its very confusing when you’re working on tracks. I’ve had tracks I’ve been working on for months, and if you listen to the fine grain of them, you end up messing the track up entirely. I’ve done that enough times. I’ve done 15 versions of some tracks before switching back 10 versions and settling with that. I think sometimes I pay too much attention to the fine grain and not enough to the feel of the track. Its ultimately more about the feel – you can get lost entirely if you go too far into the grain of it.



tP: And does reaching this wider audience have an impact too?

L: It does. Can’t See Higher on Dummy Records brought me up a level and really put pressure on me to make something just as good every time! But you can’t think about that. For now I’m going to try and make what I want to make.

tP: 
So what else have you got coming up we should know about? You’ve just put out a record with Church…

L: That remix with Church was my choice, I thought the two tracks blended together well. I also have two more remixes for different labels coming out. One is coming out in October, and then another definitely before the end of the year.

tP: Have you ever thought about doing gigs outside of clubs, maybe in a more relaxed setting?

L: Yeah, definitely. The more I DJ the more I think about doing something slightly different. I’ve been thinking about a live show.  So many people go to clubs for the madness rather than the music. Its just the setting DJs have to play in if they want to advance themselves. Thing is I’m in this DJing scene now where my music is played by DJs, so I’m not playing in the library just yet…

tP: Do you think there is much place for vinyl now that so many DJs have been liberated by the CD?

L: I use both vinyl and CD. CD because you can burn so many tracks, and I find myself a few days before a gig wanting to work something new into my set. Beatport has so many tracks you won’t find in your record store down the road. That is the easiest way to get new music – its instant. I still pick up records when I can, I prefer the sound of them and they are definitely more fun to mix with.

reprinted with permission from USSU Pulse Magazine.